Louis Armstrong

Play all songs
Play Song
Jingle Bells
Add song to playlist
Play Song
Silent Night
Add song to playlist
Play Song
White Christmas
Add song to playlist
Play Song
Zat You, Santa Claus?
Add song to playlist
Play Song
Twas The Night Before Christmas
Add song to playlist
Play Song
The Christmas Song
Add song to playlist
Play Song
The Santa Claus Blues
Add song to playlist
Play Song
Santa Claus Blues
Add song to playlist
Play Song
Winter Wonderland
Add song to playlist
Play Song
Christmas In New Orleans
Add song to playlist
Play Song
Here Is My Heart For Christmas
Add song to playlist
Christmas Duets & Collaborations
Play Song
Louis Armstrong, Ella Fitzgerald - Baby, It's Cold Outside
Add song to playlist
Play Song
Louis Armstrong, Ella Fitzgerald - Christmas In New Orleans
Add song to playlist
Play Song
Louis Armstrong, Velma Middleton - Baby, It's Cold Outside
Add song to playlist
Play Song
Ella Fitzgerald, Louis Armstrong - I've Got My Love To Keep Me Warm
Add song to playlist
ayCNhiBjaEw,Execution of request,0Jx0yDTrot4,Execution of request,-pe_DCJtOmI,LjdHjEJc-DI,HFIQqFaEAg,HFIQqFaEAg,DRHmXWrSMSQ,7RGJT9TzU0s,2Y8hmODYX6k,f1lUN85ldd8,Execution of request,0ZBFk-Y-4Jo,7K61XDJxZZg

Related Artists

Christmas Music Playlists with Louis Armstrong Songs

Now You Can Literally Have A Cool Yule

Factfile - Louis Armstrong
  • The 1925 instrumental, Santa Claus Blues, was Louis Armstrong's first Christmas recording.
  • In October 1953 at a session with the Commanders Satchmo recorded Zat You Santa Claus? and Cool Yule.
  • Armstrong duetted with Velma Middleton on Baby, It's Cold Outside, on the b-side to That's My Desire in 1958.
  • On Moments to Remember (Decca) there are 2 Benny Carter conducted Christmas songs: Christmas In New Orleans & Christmas Night In Harlem.
  • In 1957 Armstrong's record with Ella Fitzgerald, Ella and Louis Again included I've Got My Love To Keep Me Warm.
  • Here Is My Heart For Christmas appeared in the 1970 release of Louis Armstrong & Friends: What a Wonderful Christmas.
  • The Night Before Christmas (1971) was Armstrong's last recording; a reading of the Christmas story which he made in his home in New York.
  • Pops was 40 when he got his first Christmas tree. He loved it so much; his wife has said "I kept that first little tree until way after New Year's, putting it up every night and taking it down every morning, in a dozen hotels."

Louis Armstrong’s distinctive vocals and seminal trumpet playing ensured he was one of the most feted musicians in the middle part of the last century. While he was most closely aligned to the jazz fraternity his huge body of work often crossed over to the blues and pop genres which meant his audience came from every walk of life. From the very start Satchmo (as he was often known) recorded a fine collection of Christmas songs, from novel takes of old favourites to fiery new standards for which he would become synonymous. Such was the spread of his Christmas recordings over a long career that he never recorded a dedicated Christmas album so his songs were dotted amongst the otherwise non-Christmas related LP’s or released as standalone singles.

The first sign of a winter Satchmo came way back in 1925 as his career was starting to take off. The instrumental ‘Santa Claus Blues’ was released on a 78 disc and has that vintage feel so redolent of recordings from that era. Remarkably it would be a further 30 years before Armstrong returned to songs of the season. And it would be with arranger and composer Gordon Jenkins and his orchestra that Armstrong would turn out a batch of his finest Christmas recordings in 1952. Both ‘White Christmas’ and ‘Winter Wonderland’ were low tempo affairs but the combination Armstrong’s low slung vocals and Jenkins lush arrangements made for festive heaven.

In the build up to Christmas 1953 Pops (another nickname of Armstrong’s) proved that he was at the absolute peak of his powers when with able backing from his session players the Commanders he gave us ‘Zat You Santa Claus? And ‘Cool Yule’, a pair of shimmering classics that would have impressed at the best cocktail parties no matter what the time of the year it was. The fact that both songs (and 3 others) were recorded over a 24 hour period just shows the class of the man and the talented people that surrounded him.

A year later in 1954 and Pops was getting together with Velma Middleton for ‘Baby, It’s Cold Outside’ which appeared as b-side to his ‘That’s My Desire’ single. It was a skit to be sure but not many versions of the song that appeared in its wake could outdo its cheeky charm. The Christmas songs continued to come thick and fast throughout the mid-50’s with Armstrong teaming up with the brilliant conductor Benny Carter for ‘Christmas In New Orleans’. Brass heavy and slightly less electrified than the previous year’s recordings this was still a classy Christmas production. ‘Christmas Night In Harlem’ was also recorded during this seminal session and while it focused more on the vocals rather than on Armstrong’s blazing trumpeting this was just another example of the coolest yule ever put to music.

Satchmo’s second album with Ella Fitzgerald in 1957 called ‘Ella and Louis Again’ included their classic ‘I’ve Got My Love To Keep Me Warm’. With plenty of references to snow and December this is ideal Christmas material as the chemistry of the duo and the precious piano tinkling created the warmest of sounds. Following a big break from seasonal material Louis emerged again in 1970, much wiser and perhaps a little more world weary (that said he was about to record ‘What A Wonderful World’ so all was not lost!) with ‘Here Is My Heart For Christmas’. The song proved to be sentimental and a world away from ‘Cool Yule’ but was still miles ahead of the competition. The very next year in 1971 Louis’s fabled gravelly voice proved to be the perfect vehicle for his spoken word ‘The Night Before Christmas’ which proved to be his last Christmas recording.

There are many compilations that pull Satchmo’s Christmas efforts into a meaningful whole. The first compilation of note arrived in 1996 when ‘Christmas Through The Years’ served up a 10-song collection of Armstrong’s best known Christmas songs. While not comprehensive it has proven to be the best of many of its ilk. Many of the other Christmas compilations he appears on include most of his songs but also include his ‘friends’ which means there are song inclusions by different artists. A little bit odd so maybe it is best to stick with ‘Christmas Through The Years’.

Gifts I'm preparin'
For some Christmas sharin'
But I pause because
Hangin' my stockin'
I can hear a knockin'
'Zat you, Santa Claus
Louis Armstrong, 'Zat you, Santa Claus?
Author:

Louis Armstrong Christmas Album & Single Covers

Ella And Louis Again
Louis Armstrong And Friends The Christmas Collection
Louis Armstrong Baby Its Cold Outside
Louis Armstrong Christmas Through The Years
Louis Armstrong Cool Yule
Louis Armstrong Narrates The Night Before Christmas
Louis Armstrong Santa Claus Blues
Share song
tinsel tinsel
  • 00DAYS
  • 00HOURS
  • 00MINUTES
  • 00SECONDS
tinsel
baubles
Powered By You Tube
Find Us On Facebook Find Us On Facebook Find Us On Facebook Find Us On Facebook
 
close

Save Playlist

Please enter your details below to save your playlist. We need an email address and password so that you can log in and retrieve your saved playlists when you come back!

Enter a playlist name and description below.
Please give the playlist a descriptive name which is unique. E.g. 'Sams Christmas Crackers' or 'Hits from the 70s'.

 
close

Register

Complete the form below to join the Christmas fun!
YulePlay is free and we never abuse email addresses.

 
close

Sign In

Complete the form below to sign in.

loading
 
close
 
close

Sign up for the Yuleplay Newsletter

When it gets closer to the festive season we will send you the latest Christmas music news, reviews and playlists.

Sign Up